CasaCau

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In close proximity of Rome‘s most romantic fountain, in the narrow streets of Rome, a stone’s throw from the Trevi Fountain, there is CasaCau, which offers a different and atypical hotel concept, but as we are used to, of undoubted and high quality. Success depends on the personal touch and is exactly what distinguishes CasaCau and its six apartments, each with its own strong functional personality. Here you will have the impression of staying at home and you can always count on the staff at your complete disposal to help you discover the beauties of Rome, its chic shops and countless restaurants. And if you feel like cooking in your apartment, you will be provided with everything you need.

Why not take the opportunity to experience Rome as a Roman? This is the thread that proposes CasaCau. A charming 17th century building, divided into six apartments, all original, stylish and functional. All the apartments provide a fully equipped kitchen, separate bedroom and dining room.

All the six apartments are based on a retro-chic but eclectic style. Inside it has been possible to harmonize and perfectly combine the vintage design with a baroque decor and more contemporary objects and comforts. The waxed concrete, linen sheets, crystal carafes, handcrafted chairs, the Olivetti typewriter and ethnic rugs create a warm and welcoming ambiance, in which it will be easy to create one’s own personal comfort and privacy zone.

CasaCau is a place of hospitality designed, furnished and maintained with taste and love. You think you are in a nice place that will turn out to be a real surprise, because every detail goes in the direction of the guest, and therefore everyone is addressed to the needs of those who travel, whether for work or pleasure, offering a place which really makes you feel at home even away from home.

Do not expect to find a restaurant inside CasaCau, but on the other hand each apartment, as mentioned, has a kitchen equipped with pantry and fridge. You will find milk, juices, water, pasta, sugar and coffee, all included for free. Moreover, at the arrival, a shopper bag with eggs and fresh fruit will be in your kitchen inside each apartment. Last but not least, every morning, pastries are left behind each door along with a newspaper, all for maximum comfort. That said, in any case you don’t need to go far to find a great restaurant where you can taste the cuisine of Rome and then, you know, a nice walk will make you hungry.

Location

CasaCau is the nexus of all activity in Rome, from culture and history, to shopping and food. The Trevi Fountain and art collections of Palazzo Barberini and Palazzo Colonna are a mere five-minute walk away in the immediate neighbourhood, while shopping hub Piazza di Spagna and Via dei Condotti and monuments such as the Roman Forum and Patheon are a mere 10 to 15-minute walk in either direction. Metro stop Barberini is also within a five-minute walk, which means easy escapes to the Vatican, Termini Station and other parts.

Contacts

Via in Arcione 94
00187 Rome (Italy)
+39 06 6929 0159
booking@casacau.com | casacau.com

Value for Money

Apartments from Euro 380,00 per night in high season. These rates are per day and include light breakfast, groceries and free Wi-Fi. Rates are subject to change without prior notice.

Access for guests with disabilities?

No, this property is not suggested for guests with disabilities because the palace has not a lift.

Family-friendly?

Yes, definitely. An apartment can accommodate couples with up to two children, whereas others can be connected. Babysitting is available upon request. Moreover CasaCau welcomes small pets on request.


The feeling by CasaCau:

What they want to convey to everyone is that CasaCau is not only a place to stay, lovely and private, but also a discreet team made of people, never intrusive but always at disposal to each guest, if requested. The feeling thread is the freedom to enjoy the Roman vacation without stress, fixed plans or rules but knowing that the entire team of CasaCau is there for your assistance, suggestions and any kind of request. The philosophy of CasaCau is to offer a different experience where each guest will feel at home but with the enthusiasm to see new attractions and live new experiences every day.


The aim behind CasaCau by CasaCau:

In the end it all depends on what we really want. Things, gestures and feelings don’t mean anything on their own. Luxury for example. Luxury, for us, is doing what we love doing. Luxury, they say, lies in what you can’t pay for, because “there is only one real luxury, and that lies in human relations”. (Antoine de Saint Exupéry). So we have taken a 17th century residential building by Fontana di Trevi and we have converted it into six apartments to allow ourselves the luxury of doing what we love best, and to present you with the luxury of finding in Rome what wasn’t there before: a living room surrounded by everything you might need to help you discover the hidden identity of this great city, or get to know it better.

We are all perfectly aware that the best way to travel is to stay in a friend’s place: one goes back home with a piece of the place we’ve been, with the feeling, however brief, of having become part of the local scene. This is what we have in mind: to be able to assist you with discretion in getting to know the most intimate corners of the city, introduce you to the more radical local traditions and suggest unlikely places where you can discover real Rome. Whether you’re here on holiday, on business, for a meeting, a party or a wedding. Whether you wish to rent an apartment or the entire CasaCau, this will be a home for you, where you can feel truly spoilt.


When to go?

Rome is a famous place to visit no matter what time of year. But travelers must consider a number of factors, including events, weather and crowds when planning their vacation to the Eternal City. June through August sees the heaviest tourist traffic in Rome. The weather is warm to hot and the chance of rain ruining a vacation is low. The summer is ideal for sightseeing, dining at an outdoor café, and eating gelato, which is why so many travelers plan their trips during this time. Many people take vacations in summer. But if you visit during the high season, expect big crowds and long waits in line at many attractions.

Spring can also be a busy time in Rome, not only because of the beautiful weather but because of the several religious occasions. Thousands of Christians flock to Rome during Easter Week to visit its churches and museums, especially St. Peter’s Basilica and the Vatican Museums in the Vatican City or to see the Pope preside over special ceremonies. Christmas in Rome is typically less crowded than Easter, but still, a very popular time to visit Rome and the Vatican City. Although the weather is chilly, the atmosphere is festive and warm thanks to Christmas markets, especially in Piazza Navona, and a host of musical pageants and performances at area churches and theaters.

Many travelers prefer to wait until the shoulder season to visit Rome. This season, which falls between the high and low seasons, happens twice a year: April to June and September to October. Weather-wise, this is a wonderful time to visit Rome: days are mild and nights are cool. Visitors who wish to visit Rome during this time should plan their trips far in advance to avoid disappointment.

November and February are the least popular months in which to visit Rome. November is typically the rainiest month of the year and February can be definitely chilly. January and March are also low seasons. However, travelers to Rome during this time will be rewarded with near-empty museums, and the chance to observe Rome as the Romans do.

Our Special Readings

The itinerary for Rome for your first visit

If you are thinking to visit Rome soon for your first time, probably you are doing to yourself the following question: What can’t I definitely miss in Rome? Well, let me say that it is a classic million-dollar question, since the Capital of Italy is one of the largest cities and full of attractions around the world, with many famous monuments that were also sets of films that have entered right into history. Assuming that Rome was not built in a day, it will be easy to see that the Eternal City cannot even be visited in 24 hours. Visiting Rome in one day will never allow you to appreciate the beauty of this city.

The monuments of Rome are so many, the tourist map of Rome is more dense than the telephone book and then how do you determine which are the most beautiful views of Rome, or the most beautiful churches of the eternal city? And a visit to the Colosseum, how could you give up? And again: which villas to visit in Rome? And in the Vatican Museums, what to see? So here’s what to see in Rome, in an itinerary that can only be incomplete but that you can do on your next trip to Rome to start getting to know the Eternal City and the most important places of interest in the Italian Capital.

Piazza Navona

Among the things to see in Rome there is the splendid Piazza Navona, one of the most famous squares in the city, but also one of the most famous in the world and certainly one of the places to visit in Rome. The square was built at the behest of Pope Innocent X, did you know that in ancient times it was a stadium built by the emperor Domitian? In addition, the square houses three magnificent fountains: that of the Moor, that of Neptune and that of the Four Rivers, as well as the imposing Palazzo Pamphilj and the Church of Sant’Agnese in Agone.

Read More


Special City Guide: Rome

Once it ruled the Western World, and even the partial, scattered ruins of that awesome empire, of which Rome was the capital, are today among the most overpowering sights on earth. To walk the Roman Forum, to view the Colosseum, the Pantheon, and the Appian Way, these are among the most memorable, instructive, and illuminating experiences in all of travel. To see evidence of a once-great civilization that no longer exists is a humbling experience that everyone should have. Thrilling, too, are the sights of Christian Rome, which speak to the long and complex domination by this city of one of the world’s major religions. As a visitor to Rome, you will be constantly reminded of this extraordinary history.

But it’s important to remember that Rome is not just a place of the past, but one that lives and breathes and buzzes with Vespas in the here and now. So take the time to get away from the tourist hordes to explore the intimate piazzas and lesser basilicas in the backstreets of Trastevere and the centro storico. Indulge in eno-gastronomic pursuits and stuff your days with cappuccinos, pizza, trattorias, wine bars, and gelato. Have a picnic in Villa Borghese, take a vigorous walk along the Gianicolo, or nap in the grass against a fallen granite column at the Baths of Caracalla. Rome is so compact, that without even planning too much, you’ll end up enjoying both its monuments and its simpler pleasures.

Rome’s ancient monuments, whether time-blackened or gleaming in the wake of a recent restoration, are a constant reminder that Rome was one of the greatest centers of Western civilization. In the heyday of the Empire, all roads led to Rome, with good reason. It was one of the first cosmopolitan cities, importing slaves, gladiators, great art, and even citizens from the far corners of the world. Despite its carnage, brutality, and corruption, Rome left a legacy of law, a heritage of art, architecture, and engineering; and a canny lesson in how to conquer enemies by absorbing their cultures.

But ancient Rome is only part of the spectacle. The Vatican has had a tremendous influence on making the city a tourism center. Although Vatican architects stripped down much of the city’s ancient glory during the Renaissance, looting ancient ruins for their precious marble, they created more treasures and even occasionally incorporated the old into the new, as Michelangelo did when turning Diocletian’s Baths complex into a church. And in the years that followed, Bernini adorned the city with the wonders of the baroque, especially his glorious fountains.

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