Leicester House

  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House
  • Leicester House

Leicester House is a contemporary, boutique hotel situated in the heart of one of the world’s most vibrant and diverse cities, London. Located just off the square of the same name, Leicester House is wonderfully set in an elegant Georgian townhouse. These storied walls can tell a tale or two, with a history as one of the city’s favored seafood restaurants, after a stint as the Hotel du Commerce, which welcomed the likes of Karl Marx and Johann Strauss.

Today, the boutique artfully fuses contemporary charm with historic elegance, with just 14 guest rooms and three suites that create a decidedly intimate atmosphere and epitomize grown-up style. As you walk through the door, you may have noticed the three signs on the front of the building – they read LANGOUSTE, HUITRES & MOULES and hark back to when the building opened as Manzi’s seafood restaurant in 1928. Manzi’s was much loved by many generations of Londoners for over 80 years. But the history of the building goes back further, Leicester House was originally a six story Georgian townhouse, as wrote above the building was the Hotel du Commerce in the early 19th century, whose guests included Karl Marx and the Austrian composer Johann Strauss, who stayed at the hotel in 1838.

With 17 beautiful rooms, a highly praised breakfast room and a helpful and friendly team consider it your home from home in the capital. Relax over a leisurely breakfast while you watch the chefs at work in the the open kitchen. Or just head out to the 200-odd bars in the Leicester Square area alone, not only do you have a vantage point into history here, but you’re right in the center of town.

London locations don’t get much better than this: Leicester House is set in the midst of it all, located just off Leicester Square. The nearest London Underground stations are Leicester Square and Piccadilly Circus, leaving Covent Garden, Oxford Circus, Regent Street, Soho, Chinatown and Green Park within easy reach. Some of the world’s most renowned theaters, shopping streets and galleries are all just a short walk away.

Location

Soho is a hard place to pin down. The district and its southern subsection Chinatown teems with tourists going to West End Shows, media professionals marching to work, hungry patrons sampling some of London‘s best restaurants and people looking to have a long night out at one (or several) of the area’s bars and pubs. But Soho was also home to many historical figures, including Mozart, Karl Marx and The Sex Pistols. Also make the most of your stay in the city with plenty of free London attractions. From London‘s exquisite parks, to museums, such as the Science or National History Museum, historic houses, stunning art galleries and free activities for kids, there are some amazing free experiences to be had in London. Where else in the world can you meet dinosaurs, see portraits of the Tudors, travel back to the Battle of britain and see Darwins walking stick and the best part is it’s all without spending a penny?

Contacts

1 Leicester St.
London, WC2H 7BL
(United Kingdom) 
info@leicesterhouse.com | leicesterhouse.com

Don’t Miss

The Emille and Johann Suites

The Suite rooms are the very pearl of this boutique hotel, especially the ones newly refurbished three years ago, the Emille and Johann Suites that have different style and layout from the old Suite Marx and they have the bathrooms with white and black tiles in the pictures.

Value for Money

Rooms from £150 to £300 per night depending on room category and season. Breakfast included. Free Wi-Fi.
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Access for guests with disabilities?

There’s one Superior room with disabilities access and one public toilet on the first floor with disabilities access as well.

Family-friendly?

They only have two interconnecting rooms (one Suite and one Superior room) that can accommodate a family of four or they can place two extra beds (extra £130/night) in the mentioned Suite so it can accommodate 4 guests.

When to go?

It’s always time to visit London. It gets cold in the winter but rarely snowed in. It gets warm in the summer but rarely blisteringly so (in fact, most buildings don’t even have air-conditioning). The winter months are generally more humid than the summer ones but experience only slightly more rain. You don’t come to London for the weather. It can rain at any time; there’s no dry season here. Daytime temperatures can range from -1° to 35° C  but they rarely stay below 2° C or above 26° C  for too long. Evenings are usually cool, even in summer, but hot July and August days can be muggy particularly on the Underground, which is not air-conditioned. The principal art season (for theater, concerts, art shows) falls between September and May, leaving the summer months for festivals and park-going. A few royal attractions, such as the state rooms of Buckingham Palace, are only open in the summer when the Queen decamps to Scotland. In summer, when the weather is warmest, the sun sets after 10pm and half of Europe takes its annual holiday and the queues for most of the tourist attractions, such as the London Eye and the Tower of London, might make you wish you’d come in March. For decent prices and lighter crowds, go in spring or fall, April and October seem to have the best confluence of mild weather, pretty plantings, and tolerable crowds. Everything is quietest in mid-winter but a number of minor sights, such as historic houses, sometimes close from November to March and the biggest annual events take place during the warmer months!

Our Special Readings

4 things you need to know about London

We love London and think you will too, if you give it a chance. New York might be the city that never sleeps, but London follows pretty close behind. London: globally significant for being a central hub of finance, culture, history, not to mention shopping. However in case you have doubts about London, the following four things you need to know about London, will, we are sure, win you over:

London is not only cheap, but most of it is free!

It’s the stereotype that we hate the most: “London is super expensive”. If you really know where to look, London is actually cheaper than other European capitals. At the National Gallery, you can admire work by Picasso, Monet, Manet, Van Gogh, and Renoir; and that’s just in one exhibit! At the Tate Modern, the most popular modern art museum in the world, you can see works by Dali or Liechtenstein, and then have fun exploring the installments around the gallery itself, housed in a massive old power station. Head to the Victoria and Albert Museum (picture above), the Natural History Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, or even The British Library, where you’ll find the Canterbury Tales, the Rosetta Stone and the Magna Carta. All of these spots are world-class, and all of them are free. And the rest of London’s most famous attractions are best viewed from the outside, so you can admire St. Paul’s Cathedral, Trafalgar Square, the Tower Bridge, Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and the sprawling Royal Parks without paying one pence.

London cannot be “done” in a few days!

One of the greatest things about London is that all of its main attractions are in the centre and within walking distance or a few stops from each other. But that’s only the London of the guidebooks: the real spirit of the city is found in its local boroughs, spend a night partying in Camden Town (picture above), where everyone from Dylan Thomas to Amy Winehouse have lived and played. Take a stroll along the riverbanks of Putney or Kingston-Upon-Thames, or search for a Banksy mouse painted onto a wall in Shoreditch. Ride a bike along the canals of Hackney, play football in Richmond Park, and have a Sunday Roast in Wimbledon while you chat with the locals. After all, they’re the ones who make this city so special, and they’re not hanging out in Trafalgar Square; so once you check a few sights off your list, venture a stop or two further on the tube to discover everything else that London has to offer.

Read More


Special City Guide: London

Whether you realize it or not, London shaped your destiny. There’s hardly a quarter of the globe that it hasn’t changed. The United States was founded in reaction to London’s edicts. Australia was first peopled with London’s criminals. Modern Canada, South Africa, and New Zealand were cultivated from London. India’s course was irrevocably changed by the aspirations of London businessmen, as were the lives of millions of Africans who were shipped around the world while Londoners lined their pockets with profits. Even the fact that you’re reading this in English though it was written somewhere other than in England, is evidence of London’s reach across time and distance. And its dominion continues to this day: London is the world’s most popular destination for foreign tourists.

London is inexhaustible. You could tour it for months and barely get to know it. Few cities support such a variety of people living in remarkable harmony. That diversity makes London like a cut diamond; approach it from a different angle each day, and it presents an entirely fresh shape and color. From famous stories to high style, London is many things in every moment.

The old always sits alongside the new here nowhere more so than at Wren’s great baroque dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, framed by 21st-century skyscrapers and London is rightly famed for its museums and galleries. Prized collections, ancient and contemporary from Bloomsbury’s British Museum to the South Bank’s Tate Modern share top billing with small spaces such as the Sir John Soane’s Museum that could only exist in this city. Ride the London Eye observation wheel to get to grips with the city’s layout.

Read More

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