Lampa Design Hotel

  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel

Lampa Design Hotel is a popular choice amongst travelers in Istanbul, whether exploring or just passing through. Lampa Design Hotel welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location, since the hotel is located in the vibrant neighborhood of Şişli, the city center of Istanbul. This hotel introduces a unique “boutique design hotel” experience with the warmth of the antique gas lamp and industrial minimalist architecture.

The building incorporates some of the antique gas lamps from Orhan Utan’s collection within a mixture of industrial modern design, natural wood parquet, marble staircases, cast- in mosaic and generous use of metal hardware. In addition, the art pieces and enchanting facade detail conceived by Architect Selami Çiçek add the finishing touches to this exquisitely devised hotel.

All 20 different sized rooms are designed with customized furniture, special amenities and the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904-1967). Guestrooms are designed to provide an optimal level of comfort with welcoming decor and some offering convenient amenities. Glass walled bathroom and French balcony detail in every room creates a spacious feeling in the rooms. Depending on the seasonal changes their comfortable duvet sets are being changed with special healthy quilts to create the best relaxing environment in the beds. Every room has, individually programmable central air conditioning system, minibar and complimentary coffee tray and water heater. Every bathroom enhanced with rain showerheads, Co. Bigelow bathroom amenities and specially packed personal care products. As standard features, each room has laptop size safe boxes, direct line phone and free wireless connection.

The Lampa Lab is the place where guests can enjoy their delicious breakfast and afternoon coffee, with terrarium designs. The Lampa Lab can be used both for special events and as a collective working space. There’s free Wi-Fi for the guests business related demands. It is also finished with beautifully decorated open-air terrace.

Lampa Design Hotel supporting holistic approach for hospitality. Design concept is not only limited with architecture but also the services offered are customized. With solar panels, led lightening, natural materials and recyclable products, Lampa Design Hotel provides environmental friendly services. Lampa Design Hotel is located in the neighborhood of Şişli, the center of Istanbul. It welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location and offers you unmatched flexibility, since it lies in the middle of the major touristic district Taksim Square and the main business area Maslak. The hotel is not only a convenient base to discover the city on foot but also by subway and bus connections, since it is situated in between 2 main metro stop and many different bus stops.

Location

Lampa Design Hotel is located in the neighborhood of Şişli, the center of Istanbul. It welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location and offers you unmatched flexibility, since it lies in the middle of the major touristic district Taksim Square and the main business area Maslak. Sisli is one of the major 32 districts of Istanbul on the European side of the city. Although not by the sea, it’s located at the exit from the Bosphorus Bridge that links Asia to Europe. Its total area is about 30 square kilometers and is considered to be a new settlement flourished after mid-19th century to the north of Taksim Square. There are many old mosques, Christian churches, and Jewish synagogues in the district. Lately it became also one of the small business and finance centers of Istanbul especially with some high rises and modern shopping malls such as Cevahir Mall, one of the biggest in Europe. Some other important buildings, venues and locations in Sisli district are: military museum, Cemal Resit Rey and Lutfi Kirdar concert halls and exhibition centers, movie and stage theaters, university faculties, Ali Sami Yen football stadium of Galatasaray, exquisite shops at Rumeli street and Nisantasi, fine restaurants and bars in Macka neighborhood, Tesvikiye area, and so on.

Contacts

Halaskargazi Caddesi Operator Raif Bey Sokak n.35
34363 Sisli,
Istanbul, (Turkey)
info@lampahotel.com | lampahotel.com

Don’t Miss

Lampa Lab:

Lampa Lab where you would have your open buffet breakfast in the morning; is open during day. Coffee machine and a fresh cooked cake is on the table ready for your service as complimentary downstairs.

Deluxe Terrace Room:

35sq mt Deluxe Terrace Room has a balcony with coffee table set where you can enjoy your day. It also has a full size jacuzzi in the bathroom in addition to the shower.

Value for Money

Double rooms are from just 50,00 Euros in low season; and from 60,00 Euros in high. These rates are per room and per day and include breakfast and free Wi-Fi. Rates are subject to change without prior notice. Please check out the website for promotions and special deals.

Access for guests with disabilities?

Lampa Design Hotel is not certified as disability friendly officially. However, there is ramp at the entrance, and all floors are elevator accessible. If you have any special needs please feel free to get in contact with us that we would like to make sure you would be getting the best of your needs.

Family-friendly?

Family Room, which is two interconnecting, rooms, with private bathrooms in both rooms; a kitchenette with small living room can handle up to 6 guests. The hotel can provide baby cot or extra bed for the kids in the rooms.

The passion of owner Mr Orhan Utan:

The word “Lampa” means lamp in several different Turkish dialects, as well as in several other languages. The owner Orhan Utan chose this name because of his love and appreciation for antique gas lamps. Mr. Utan has been collecting lamps for the past 15 years. His collection includes nearly 200 pieces and every piece is being hand selected and sometimes even repaired by him personally. As an avid collector, Mr. Utan to this day is always in the search of the perfect new pieces to add to his ever-growing collection. It is not a coincidence that Mr. Utan’s enthusiasm for gas lamps has inspired the design of the newly opened hotel. Lampa hotel introduces a unique “boutique design hotel” experience with the warmth of the antique gas lamp and industrial minimalist architecture. The building incorporates some of the antique gas lamps from Orhan Utan’s collection within a mixture of industrial modern design, natural wood parquet, marble staircases, cast-in mosaic and generous use of metal hardware. In addition, the art pieces and enchanting facade detail conceived by Architect Selami Çiçek add the finishing touches to this exquisitely devised hotel.

The Lampa Lab exhibits the remarkable touch of the architect Nilüfer Kozikoglu and the patio is adorned with Fem Güçlütürk’s terrarium designs. All 20 different sized rooms are decorated with  the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904 – 1967).

When to go?

Deciding the best time to visit Istanbul during the year is an important task. Whereas every season offers something beautiful and unique to travelers, much of how you decide when to visit Istanbul will depend on what you want out of your Turkish holiday. That’s why we’ve written this handy little guide to let you know the pros and cons of each season. Like anywhere, Istanbul’s weather can be unpredictable, but in general the city is known for its hot summers and rainy winters. Although most travelers come to Istanbul during the summer season, we think the other seasons are equally good, if not better, times to explore Istanbul. Who doesn’t love escaping to the Turkish bath for some decadent relaxation on a cold winter’s day or enjoying a ferry boat ride on a crisp fall afternoon? Our favorite season might be the springtime when the city’s tulip gardens are in full bloom and if you keep your eyes peeled and you might even see dolphins in the Bosphorus.

Before traveling to Istanbul, take note of the Turkish holidays, especially Ramadan bayram and Kurban bayram (religious holidays) which fall on different dates every year. Islamic holidays are not the best time of year to visit Istanbul or the rest of Turkey because, Istanbul’s tourist attractions and shops may be closed or have limited working hours. This is especially true on the first day of each holiday. Most Istanbulites travel to the coast for a beach vacation or visit their family’s villages to spend time with extended family when they get time off, so public transport can also be packed around the holidays. The festive atmosphere in the streets of Istanbul, or really anywhere in Turkey can be amazing to take part in, but if its site-seeing you’re after try to avoid these two holidays when you plan the dates for your trip.

Spring (April to mid May)

If you have the opportunity to visit Istanbul in the spring, don’t miss it! The summer heat hasn’t set in yet and although the temperatures may drop in the evening, all you need is a light jacket for the mild days. Plus, the bulk of the summer crowds haven’t arrived yet. In April, the entire city is in bloom for the International Tulip Festival held throughout the month. If visiting Istanbul in April make sure you head to Emirgan Park to see the most magnificent tulip display the city has to offer. You might be surprised to learn that the tulip is originally from Turkey, not Holland. In fact, tulips are so central to Turkish culture that you will see them everywhere from the Ottoman tulip motif on silk scarfs to the tulip shape of Turkish tea glasses.

Summer (June to early September)

Summer is high tourist season in Turkey which means the lines for Istanbul attractions and other tourism sites around Turkey are as long as they’re going to get all year. This is especially true when the cruise ships come into town. The weather can get quite hot and humid  so unless you’re from a warm country, you may find the heat too much to handle. If that’s the case, do as the Turks do and head to the seaside when the heat spikes. In Istanbul, you can hit the beaches in Kilyos or the Princes’ Islands. Otherwise, head down south to the Mediterranean Sea or take a windsurfing holiday in the trendy seaside town of Alaçatı. If you plan to stay in Istanbul, just make sure you stay well hydrated!

Winter (December to March)

Istanbul gets its fair share of rain in the winter with the occasional heavy snowfall. However, if you aren’t afraid of getting wet you’ll be rewarded with much shorter queues at the main Istanbul attractions. It’s also the perfect time to enjoy a traditional Turkish bath at one of the best Turkish baths in Istanbul or taste the delicious sahlep, Turkey’s iconic winter beverage, at a neighborhood cafe or street stand. In the evening, sip on local Turkish wine at a wine house (the Turkish version of wine bars, including delicious mezzes) or enjoy the fiery warmth of a glass of strong raki. With fewer tourists, the local possibilities in the city really open up. You can visit an independent film festival during the day, take a traditional Turkish cooking class, or attend a whirling dervish show in the evening. Best of all you won’t have to worry about anything selling out. In the nearby city of Bursa, you can even hit the ski slopes on Uludağ Mountain.

Fall (mid September to November)

September is still considered tourist season in Istanbul but as the fall deepens, the crowds thin and you may start to see discounted, off-season prices. Now is the time to get that bargain at the Grand Bazaar, not in the summer when the vendors have plenty of customers! Fall is also the perfect time of year for wandering Istanbul’s back streets, visiting neighborhood bazaars to admire the summer’s final bounty, and enjoying all the fresh seafood that hits the markets and best restaurant in Istanbul with the opening of fishing season. But, fall, like winter, can be rainly. Although you’ll have some beautiful fall days, it’s good to be prepared for the wet ones.

Our Special Readings

Istanbul in 3 days

A friend once told me that Istanbul is such a vast, vibrant and multilayered city that it would take years to truly know it, and he was right. Once at the heart of the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, it’s one of the world’s most historically rich destinations. With Asia and Europe straddling either side of its glittering Bosphorus Strait, it’s also replete with paradoxes: East and West, old and new. It’s virtually impossible to truly experience Istanbul in just 3 days, but you can get a taste of the city’s magic, if you’re well prepared.

What to See
Day One

Though you might be tempted to speed-visit Istanbul’s historic sites in order to get to all of them, I’d strongly recommend picking just three and taking your time to really soak in and appreciate each one. If it’s your first time in Istanbul, I’d recommend the Blue Mosque, Aya Sofya and Topkapi Palace. The iconic, 400-year-old Blue Mosque boasts six minarets (most mosques usually have only four) and soaring ceilings lined with thousands of blue İznik tiles. Equally, if not more breathtaking is the Aya Sofya, built in 537 as the greatest Church in Christendom then converted to a mosque in the 14th Century. The opulent Topkapi Palace was the residence of Ottoman Sultans for over 400 years, and today houses holy Muslim relics. (I’d allot at least four hours at Topkapi, and make sure to visit the Harem: a labyrinth of around 300 luxuriously tiled private rooms).

Day Two

Dedicating an entire day to eating and shopping in favor of more sightseeing might seem wasteful, but with food being such an integral part of Turkish culture (and a means of learning about its colorful history), I’d highly recommend it. A dedicated half-day food tour like Istanbul Eats ensures that you experience truly authentic local food (no easy feat in tourist-congested areas like Sultanahmet), while allowing you to explore neighborhoods you wouldn’t otherwise go. (After soaking in the mind-numbing opulence and grandeur of Istanbul’s mosques and palaces, visiting the humbler, working-class areas right outside Sultanahmet was an eye-opening experience for me). Once the tour’s over, I’d recommend backtracking your steps to The Spice Market in Eminönü, where you can snack on delicious dried fruit leathers at Malatya Pazari and goatskin-ripened cheeses at Cankurtaran Gida. In the evening, haggle your way through the frenetic The Grand Bazaar: the infamous Byzantine maze of 4.000 shops.

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Strolling through the mosques of Istanbul

Beloved for its complex, layered past, Istanbul, where East meets West, may also offer a vision of what’s to come. There is so much to do while exploring the city of Istanbul, countless foods to sample, sites to visit and culture to thoroughly immerse one’s self in. But, some of the most impressive historical and architectural gems of the city are the numerous mosques whose minarets dot the landscape. During your stay at Lampa Design Hotel, a new popular choice amongst travelers in Istanbul which provides 20 different sized rooms, all designed with customized furniture, special amenities and the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı, take your time to explore the following mosques, captivating symbols of this amazing capital.

Hagia Sophia

It is perhaps the city’s most recognizable site. It stands as one of greatest examples of Byzantine architecture in the world. Though no longer an active mosque, the Hagia Sophia did serve as a model for the most striking and important religious structures built during the Ottoman Empire. The building began as a basilica during the Byzantine Empire and was converted to a mosque following the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks in 1453. Many of the Christian elements of the structure were removed, including the altar and iconostasis. Mosaics depicting Christian themes were plastered over due to the forbiddance of representational imagery in Islam. Islamic features were added to the building over time. The architecture of the Hagia Sophia influenced designers of later mosques in Istanbul and the Hagia Sophia served as the main religious structure in Istanbul for half a century. In 1935 the Republic of Turkey converted the Hagia Sophia into a museum. Plaster covering early Christian mosaics was removed during restoration as were carpets covering much of the interior, revealing marble decorations.

Sultan Ahmed Mosque

It is known by many as the Blue Mosque, due to the blue hued tiles covering the walls of the interior of the building. The mosque was constructed between 1609 and 1616, under the reign of Ahmed I. The sultan ordered the religious structure built facing Hagia Sophia, the most honored mosque in the Ottoman Empire at that time. The architecture of the mosque combines both Ottoman and Byzantine elements and is considered the last significant mosque of the classical period of the Ottoman Empire. A large courtyard surrounded by an arcade greets visitors to the mosque. The impressive interior is decorated with intricately designed ceramic tiles and low hanging chandeliers light the prayer room. The mosque is one of only two in Turkey to have six minarets. Five times a day the call to prayer can be heard from the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, a beautiful, enchanting sound that echoes throughout the city.

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Winter in Istanbul

Sometimes the best travel experiences come from not following the crowds. In fact, in one of the world’s most lauded cities, avoiding the herd can result in a far more enriching experience. Istanbul is a destination that stirs the emotions of historians, culture lovers and travelers alike. If you are prepared to visit this enigmatic city out of peak season, some of its greatest treasures can be enjoyed (almost) all to yourself. Istanbul is a dynamic, modern metropolis steeped in history, a place of continuous global significance for thousands of years. It connects Asia and Europe, straddling the Bosphorus Strait and enduring as an epicenter for culture, art and trade. Istanbul is beautiful and fascinating and it is no wonder that almost everyone with an incurable wanderlust has Istanbul high on their list. And here lies the problem.

Istanbul welcomes 13 million visitors annually and during peak travel times, congestion at many of the famous landmarks and heritage sites can be significant. Nothing crushes a sightseeing itinerary like a two-hour wait in line at each location. Winter in Istanbul has its challenges as well. Daytime temperatures can hover a little above freezing and at times the city is subject to reasonable snow falls. However, there is an undeniable romantic appeal to the seeing the towers of the ancient mosques dusted in snow. Here are six ways to skip the crowds and see the city’s less-touristy sights in the winter.

The Blue Mosque

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, known as The Blue Mosque for the blue tiles surrounding the walls of its interior is breathtaking. The 400-year-old Mosque is beautiful and although a popular place for tourists to visit, is still a functioning mosque and not a museum. As such, at scheduled prayer times each day visitors must leave. In summer, expect a wait of several hours to get a peek inside. In the winter there were very few tourists and no lines. The majority of people inside the towering and intensely ornate main chamber were not tourists, but those reverently observing their faith. It feels like a more authentic and beautiful experience.

The Cisterns

A small, non-descript building is the entryway to ancient Roman cisterns. The perfectly-preserved, subterranean monument is a testimony to Roman building techniques. The scale and beauty of the construction made to simply store water is stunning. The arches and columns cover several acres underground. We shared the experience with a few students and visiting historians, much different from the masses that visit during peak season.

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Special City Guide: Istanbul

More than Ottoman minarets and beguiling bazaars, Turkey’s cultural capital is also fashionable and progressive. Spanning both Asia and Europe and divided by the Bosphorus, Istanbul is a beguiling mix of ancient and modern, of conservative and secular. The hulking Byzantine Hagia Sophia and opulent Topkapi Palace dominate the old city Sultanahmet, but over in Karaköy, in a converted warehouse, the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art embraces the future. Along Galata Bridge, fishermen looking for dinner dip their rods into the waters of the Golden Horn. Walk past them to buzzing, bazaar-filled Eminönü where locals stock up on fresh pistachios and crumbly sheep’s cheese from the aromatic Spice Market. The sunset call to prayer from pencil-slim minarets brings welcome serenity, especially from mosques clustering the busy Old City, crammed with elegant Ottoman and Byzantine landmarks. Families crowd onto passenger boats at weekends to cruise the Bosphorus, Istanbul’s real gem, past pastel-colored wooden summer houses.

At 500 years old, the sprawling Grand Bazaar in Beyazit remains vibrant, carpet and gold dealers are as persuasive as in Mehmet the Conqueror’s day. It’s also the best place to haggle for an inlaid backgammon set. In Istanbul’s modern Beyoglu, it’s back to the 21st century along the packed, pedestrianized Istiklal Caddesi, lined with sleek bookshops and local fashion chains. Kitten-heeled shoppers find the latest designs in chic boutiques like Turkish designer Bahar Korcan in Nisantasi. In cultured Istanbul, you’re never far away from an arts, film or music festival. It may be opera in the cavernous Atatürk Cultural Centre in Taksim Square or summertime jazz in Cemil Topuzlu open-air theater in leafy Harbiye. Beyoglu is where Istanbul’s revelers head to sip cocktails at fashionable rooftop bars or join friends at outdoor cafés with a tulip-shaped glass of tea. At funky Babylon club, catch the latest Balkan fusion band, or join football-mad fans on the terraces to cheer on Besiktas.

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