Lampa Design Hotel

  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel
  • Lampa Design Hotel

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Lampa Design Hotel is a popular choice amongst travelers in Istanbul, whether exploring or just passing through. Lampa Design Hotel welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location, since the hotel is located in the vibrant neighborhood of Şişli, the city center of Istanbul. This hotel introduces a unique “boutique design hotel” experience with the warmth of the antique gas lamp and industrial minimalist architecture.

The building incorporates some of the antique gas lamps from Orhan Utan’s collection within a mixture of industrial modern design, natural wood parquet, marble staircases, cast- in mosaic and generous use of metal hardware. In addition, the art pieces and enchanting facade detail conceived by Architect Selami Çiçek add the finishing touches to this exquisitely devised hotel.

All 20 different sized rooms are designed with customized furniture, special amenities and the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904-1967). Guestrooms are designed to provide an optimal level of comfort with welcoming decor and some offering convenient amenities. Glass walled bathroom and French balcony detail in every room creates a spacious feeling in the rooms. Depending on the seasonal changes their comfortable duvet sets are being changed with special healthy quilts to create the best relaxing environment in the beds. Every room has, individually programmable central air conditioning system, minibar and complimentary coffee tray and water heater. Every bathroom enhanced with rain showerheads, Co. Bigelow bathroom amenities and specially packed personal care products. As standard features, each room has laptop size safe boxes, direct line phone and free wireless connection.

The Lampa Lab is the place where guests can enjoy their delicious breakfast and afternoon coffee, with terrarium designs. The Lampa Lab can be used both for special events and as a collective working space. There’s free Wi-Fi for the guests business related demands. It is also finished with beautifully decorated open-air terrace.

Lampa Design Hotel supporting holistic approach for hospitality. Design concept is not only limited with architecture but also the services offered are customized. With solar panels, led lightening, natural materials and recyclable products, Lampa Design Hotel provides environmental friendly services. Lampa Design Hotel is located in the neighborhood of Şişli, the center of Istanbul. It welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location and offers you unmatched flexibility, since it lies in the middle of the major touristic district Taksim Square and the main business area Maslak. The hotel is not only a convenient base to discover the city on foot but also by subway and bus connections, since it is situated in between 2 main metro stop and many different bus stops.

Comfort Room

The 18 sqm Comfort Rooms feature customized furniture and lighting, a glass-walled bathroom with privacy blind, blackout shutters and an intriguing headboard by the celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904 – 1967).  There are 8 Comfort Rooms available with King or Twin bed options. The amenities included are: Minibar, 32 inch LCD TV, Cable/Satellite TV Channels, Telephone, Free High Speed Wi-Fi, Individual Heat and Air Conditioning Control, Large Windows that Open to City View, In-Room Safe (large enough to store and charge laptop computer), A Marble Bathroom with Rain Shower, Exclusive Co.Bigelow Bathroom Amenities, Bathrobes and Slippers, Wardrobe/Closet Hairdryer, Free Toiletries, A Full Mini-Bar, Free Coffee and Tea, Electric Kettle, Complimentary 1 Bottle of Water at Check-In, Wake-Up Service.

Comfort Plus Room

The 22 sqm Comfort Plus Rooms feature customized furniture and lightening, a glass-walled bathroom with privacy blind, blackout shutters and an intriguing headboard by the celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904 – 1967). In addition the Comfort Plus Rooms are equipped with a reading chair and a side table. There are 10 Comfort Plus Rooms are available with King and Twin bed options. The amenities included are: Minibar, 32 inch LCD TV, Cable/Satellite TV Channels, Telephone, Free High Speed Wi-Fi, Individual Heat and Air Conditioning Control, Large Windows that Open to City View, In-Room Safe (large enough to store and charge laptop computer), A Marble Bathroom with Rain Shower, Exclusive Co.Bigelow Bathroom Amenities, Bathrobes and Slippers, Wardrobe/Closet Hairdryer, Free Toiletries, A Full Mini-Bar, Free Coffee and Tea, Electric Kettle, Complimentary 1 Bottle of Water at Check-In, Wake-Up Service and Additional Desk.

Deluxe Terrace Room

There are 2 Deluxe Terrace Rooms with size of 30 sqm. Both have their own private balconies. Maximum occupancy for this room type is 3 people. It ensures the best comfort with it is King size bed and a sofa-bed. In addition to standard bathroom details, Deluxe Terrace Rooms have their jacuzzi sets ready for the guests. There are 2 Deluxe Terrace Rooms available only with King bed options. The amenities included are: Minibar, 32 inch LCD TV, Cable/Satellite TV Channels, Telephone, Free High Speed Wi-Fi, Individual Heat and Air Conditioning Control, Large Windows that Open to City View, In-Room Safe (large enough to store and charge laptop computer), A Marble Bathroom with Rain Shower, Exclusive Co.Bigelow Bathroom Amenities, Bathrobes and Slippers, Wardrobe/Closet Hairdryer, Free Toiletries, A Full Mini-Bar, Free Coffee and Tea, Electric Kettle, Complimentary 1 Bottle of Water at Check-In, Wake-Up Service.

Lobby Hall

The Lobby Hall is where they welcome their guests with special treats. An iMac is ready for the guests use which is also connected with a copy and scanner system.

News

The passion of owner Mr Orhan Utan:

The word “Lampa” means lamp in several different Turkish dialects, as well as in several other languages. The owner Orhan Utan chose this name because of his love and appreciation for antique gas lamps. Mr. Utan has been collecting lamps for the past 15 years. His collection includes nearly 200 pieces and every piece is being hand selected and sometimes even repaired by him personally. As an avid collector, Mr. Utan to this day is always in the search of the perfect new pieces to add to his ever-growing collection. It is not a coincidence that Mr. Utan’s enthusiasm for gas lamps has inspired the design of the newly opened hotel. Lampa hotel introduces a unique “boutique design hotel” experience with the warmth of the antique gas lamp and industrial minimalist architecture. The building incorporates some of the antique gas lamps from Orhan Utan’s collection within a mixture of industrial modern design, natural wood parquet, marble staircases, cast-in mosaic and generous use of metal hardware. In addition, the art pieces and enchanting facade detail conceived by Architect Selami Çiçek add the finishing touches to this exquisitely devised hotel.

The Lampa Lab exhibits the remarkable touch of the architect Nilüfer Kozikoglu and the patio is adorned with Fem Güçlütürk’s terrarium designs. All 20 different sized rooms are decorated with  the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı (1904 – 1967).

When to go:

Deciding the best time to visit Istanbul during the year is an important task. Whereas every season offers something beautiful and unique to travelers, much of how you decide when to visit Istanbul will depend on what you want out of your Turkish holiday. That’s why we’ve written this handy little guide to let you know the pros and cons of each season. Like anywhere, Istanbul’s weather can be unpredictable, but in general the city is known for its hot summers and rainy winters. Although most travelers come to Istanbul during the summer season, we think the other seasons are equally good, if not better, times to explore Istanbul. Who doesn’t love escaping to the Turkish bath for some decadent relaxation on a cold winter’s day or enjoying a ferry boat ride on a crisp fall afternoon? Our favorite season might be the springtime when the city’s tulip gardens are in full bloom and if you keep your eyes peeled and you might even see dolphins in the Bosphorus.

Before traveling to Istanbul, take note of the Turkish holidays, especially Ramadan bayram and Kurban bayram (religious holidays) which fall on different dates every year. Islamic holidays are not the best time of year to visit Istanbul or the rest of Turkey because, Istanbul’s tourist attractions and shops may be closed or have limited working hours. This is especially true on the first day of each holiday. Most Istanbulites travel to the coast for a beach vacation or visit their family’s villages to spend time with extended family when they get time off, so public transport can also be packed around the holidays. The festive atmosphere in the streets of Istanbul, or really anywhere in Turkey can be amazing to take part in, but if its site-seeing you’re after try to avoid these two holidays when you plan the dates for your trip.

Spring (April to mid May)

If you have the opportunity to visit Istanbul in the spring, don’t miss it! The summer heat hasn’t set in yet and although the temperatures may drop in the evening, all you need is a light jacket for the mild days. Plus, the bulk of the summer crowds haven’t arrived yet. In April, the entire city is in bloom for the International Tulip Festival held throughout the month. If visiting Istanbul in April make sure you head to Emirgan Park to see the most magnificent tulip display the city has to offer. You might be surprised to learn that the tulip is originally from Turkey, not Holland. In fact, tulips are so central to Turkish culture that you will see them everywhere from the Ottoman tulip motif on silk scarfs to the tulip shape of Turkish tea glasses.

Summer (June to early September)

Summer is high tourist season in Turkey which means the lines for Istanbul attractions and other tourism sites around Turkey are as long as they’re going to get all year. This is especially true when the cruise ships come into town. The weather can get quite hot and humid  so unless you’re from a warm country, you may find the heat too much to handle. If that’s the case, do as the Turks do and head to the seaside when the heat spikes. In Istanbul, you can hit the beaches in Kilyos or the Princes’ Islands. Otherwise, head down south to the Mediterranean Sea or take a windsurfing holiday in the trendy seaside town of Alaçatı. If you plan to stay in Istanbul, just make sure you stay well hydrated!

Winter (December to March)

Istanbul gets its fair share of rain in the winter with the occasional heavy snowfall. However, if you aren’t afraid of getting wet you’ll be rewarded with much shorter queues at the main Istanbul attractions. It’s also the perfect time to enjoy a traditional Turkish bath at one of the best Turkish baths in Istanbul or taste the delicious sahlep, Turkey’s iconic winter beverage, at a neighborhood cafe or street stand. In the evening, sip on local Turkish wine at a wine house (the Turkish version of wine bars, including delicious mezzes) or enjoy the fiery warmth of a glass of strong raki. With fewer tourists, the local possibilities in the city really open up. You can visit an independent film festival during the day, take a traditional Turkish cooking class, or attend a whirling dervish show in the evening. Best of all you won’t have to worry about anything selling out. In the nearby city of Bursa, you can even hit the ski slopes on Uludağ Mountain.

Fall (mid September to November)

September is still considered tourist season in Istanbul but as the fall deepens, the crowds thin and you may start to see discounted, off-season prices. Now is the time to get that bargain at the Grand Bazaar, not in the summer when the vendors have plenty of customers! Fall is also the perfect time of year for wandering Istanbul’s back streets, visiting neighborhood bazaars to admire the summer’s final bounty, and enjoying all the fresh seafood that hits the markets and best restaurant in Istanbul with the opening of fishing season. But, fall, like winter, can be rainly. Although you’ll have some beautiful fall days, it’s good to be prepared for the wet ones.

Lampa Lab

The Lampa Lab, where guests can enjoy their delicious breakfast and afternoon coffee, while enjoying the remarkable terrarium designs. Lampa Lab is also a perfect location for small gatherings and events. It has a fresh Air Patio, working space with free Wi-Fi and an open air smoking area.

Lampa Design Hotel is located in the neighborhood of Şişli, the center of Istanbul. It welcomes you to explore Istanbul from the most ideal location and offers you unmatched flexibility, since it lies in the middle of the major touristic district Taksim Square and the main business area Maslak. Sisli is one of the major 32 districts of Istanbul on the European side of the city. Although not by the sea, it’s located at the exit from the Bosphorus Bridge that links Asia to Europe. Its total area is about 30 square kilometers and is considered to be a new settlement flourished after mid-19th century to the north of Taksim Square. There are many old mosques, Christian churches, and Jewish synagogues in the district. Lately it became also one of the small business and finance centers of Istanbul especially with some high rises and modern shopping malls such as Cevahir Mall, one of the biggest in Europe. Some other important buildings, venues and locations in Sisli district are: military museum, Cemal Resit Rey and Lutfi Kirdar concert halls and exhibition centers, movie and stage theaters, university faculties, Ali Sami Yen football stadium of Galatasaray, exquisite shops at Rumeli street and Nisantasi, fine restaurants and bars in Macka neighborhood, Tesvikiye area, and so on.

Visit the Basilica Cistern – The city’s most unexpectedly romantic attraction, the Basilica Cistern, offers an insight into the complicated system that once brought drinking water into Istanbul from Thrace (an area of the south-east Balkans now constituting Turkish land n the European mainland, and a chunk of Bulgaria). Constructed in the sixth century and then forgotten for centuries, the cistern that once stored the water has been fitted with lights and music. Fish flitter around the bases of the 336 columns that support the ceiling. Don’t miss the upside-down head of Medusa that forms the bottom of one column, proof that Byzantine builders saw Roman relics as little more than reusable rubble..

Discover the Aya Sofya – After decades in which scaffolding cluttered the interior of Emperor Justinian’s sixth-century Byzantine masterpiece, the thrill of being able to experience the extraordinary spaciousness of this famous church-turned-mosque-turned museum is hard to overstate. Downstairs the building is largely empty; the best of the glittering mosaics lurk in the galleries upstairs. Newly opened are the tombs of several early Ottoman sultans and their slaughtered sons, before primogeniture new sultans immediately had all potential rivals killed. Before the end of the year, the city’s finest carpets will go on display in the soup kitchen added after the church was turned into a mosque.

Visit the Topkapi Palace If there is one absolute must-see in Istanbul, it has to be the Topkapi Palace, home to generations of sultans and their wives, who were closeted in the famous harem. A collection of lush green courtyards and delicate kiosks, the Topkapi boasts a treasury to put the crown jewels in the shade, as well as views to die for over the Sea of Marmara, Bosphorus and Golden Horn. The secretive harem, really just the family quarters, is a warren of lushly-tiled rooms wrapped round a gem of a Turkish bath. Try to visit on a day when no cruise ship is in town to avoid the worst of the crowds.

Visit the Blue Mosque – Facing Aya Sofya across a small park and mirroring its domed silhouette, the early 17th-century Blue Mosque is one of only a handful of mosques in the world to boast six minarets. Is it really blue? Well, not noticeably, although all the walls are papered with fine İznik tiles. To view it as the architect, Sedefkar Mehmed Aga, originally intended, enter via what looks like the side entrance from the Hippodrome. Afterwards, pop your head into a building the size of a small mosque on the corner of the complex. This houses the tomb of Sultan Ahmed I, the man who gave his name to both the mosque and the neighbourhood.

Explore the Turkish and Islamic MuseumHoused in what was originally the palace of Ibrahim Pasha, a favourite grand vizier of Suleiman the Magnificent, and overlooking the Hippodrome where Byzantine lovers of chariot racing once brought the same passion to their sport as modern Turks do to football, this museum houses a magnificent collection of gigantic carpets from all over the country. Its basement features reconstructions of everything from a fully-fitted nomad tent to a grand interior from a 19th-century Bursa mansion. Don’t leave without trying a thick black Turkish coffee in the pretty cafe in the grounds.

Discover the Chora Church – It’s a bit of a schlep to get there but the restored Chora Church in the old city walls offers a stunning glimpse of late Byzantine splendour, its walls and ceilings adorned with glittering mosaics and breath-taking frescoes. Like Aya Sofya, it has made the journey from Byzantine church to Ottoman mosque and then to modern museum, and now stands in a neighbourhood of restored Ottoman wooden houses, prettily painted in pastel colours. Before you go back to your hotel, take a look at the nearby walls that ringed old Constantinople and date back to the fifth century.

Reach the Galata Tower Watery Istanbul is a city that cries out to be viewed from on high, and you can get a bird’s-eye view of everything from the balcony at the top of the Galata Tower in Beyoğlu, the modern part of old Istanbul that, in pre-Republican days, was home to the city’s foreign residents. Built in 1348, the tower once formed part of a sub-city belonging to the Genoese that stretched right down to the Bosphorus. In a footnote to aviation history, it was from this tower that Hezârfen Ahmed Çelebi flew across the Bosphorus from Europe to Asia in 1638, thus inaugurating the first ever intercontinental flight.

Discover the Süleymaniye Mosque – Unmissable as you stand on the busy Galata bridge and look up at the city’s historic skyline is the mosque designed by the great Ottoman architect Sinan for Suleiman the Magnificent. Newly restored to its original splendour, it is generally regarded as the finest of the 42 surviving mosques he designed for Istanbul. Unusually, it retains much of the original complex of social service buildings that came attached to it, including several madrasahs, a hospital, a library and a hamam. Locals come here to eat kuru fasuliye, the Turkish take on baked beans, in a street once haunted by opium addicts.

Halaskargazi Caddesi Operator Raif Bey Sokak n.35
34363 Sisli,
Istanbul, (Turkey)
info@lampahotel.com | lampahotel.com

Strolling through the mosques of Istanbul

Beloved for its complex, layered past, Istanbul, where East meets West, may also offer a vision of what’s to come. There is so much to do while exploring the city of Istanbul, countless foods to sample, sites to visit and culture to thoroughly immerse one’s self in. But, some of the most impressive historical and architectural gems of the city are the numerous mosques whose minarets dot the landscape. During your stay at Lampa Design Hotel, a new popular choice amongst travelers in Istanbul which provides 20 different sized rooms, all designed with customized furniture, special amenities and the unique art pieces inspired by celebrated artist Fikret Mualla Saygı, take your time to explore the following mosques, captivating symbols of this amazing capital.

Hagia Sophia

It is perhaps the city’s most recognizable site. It stands as one of greatest examples of Byzantine architecture in the world. Though no longer an active mosque, the Hagia Sophia did serve as a model for the most striking and important religious structures built during the Ottoman Empire. The building began as a basilica during the Byzantine Empire and was converted to a mosque following the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks in 1453. Many of the Christian elements of the structure were removed, including the altar and iconostasis. Mosaics depicting Christian themes were plastered over due to the forbiddance of representational imagery in Islam. Islamic features were added to the building over time. The architecture of the Hagia Sophia influenced designers of later mosques in Istanbul and the Hagia Sophia served as the main religious structure in Istanbul for half a century. In 1935 the Republic of Turkey converted the Hagia Sophia into a museum. Plaster covering early Christian mosaics was removed during restoration as were carpets covering much of the interior, revealing marble decorations.

Sultan Ahmed Mosque

It is known by many as the Blue Mosque, due to the blue hued tiles covering the walls of the interior of the building. The mosque was constructed between 1609 and 1616, under the reign of Ahmed I. The sultan ordered the religious structure built facing Hagia Sophia, the most honored mosque in the Ottoman Empire at that time. The architecture of the mosque combines both Ottoman and Byzantine elements and is considered the last significant mosque of the classical period of the Ottoman Empire. A large courtyard surrounded by an arcade greets visitors to the mosque. The impressive interior is decorated with intricately designed ceramic tiles and low hanging chandeliers light the prayer room. The mosque is one of only two in Turkey to have six minarets. Five times a day the call to prayer can be heard from the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, a beautiful, enchanting sound that echoes throughout the city.

Süleymaniye Mosque

It is the city’s second largest mosque (picture above), constructed in the mid-16th Century by Suleiman the Magnificent. Like many of the Ottoman mosques throughout the city, a large courtyard precedes the main building. The four minarets of the mosque are located at the corners of the courtyard and a large colonnade forms the perimeter of the outdoor space. The interior is more subdued when compared to that of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, but still quite beautiful. Ceramic tiles adorn the walls and domed ceiling.

Yeni Mosque (or New Mosque)

It is yet another example of an imperial, religious building constructed during the Ottoman Empire. The building is located near the Galata Bridge, on the Golden Horn. Plans for the mosque began in the late 16th Century, but due to political and financial constraints, the building was not completed until 1663. An impressive number of domes and semi-domes, sixty-six in total, mark the exterior. Once inside, visitors can observe the impressive tile work decorating each of the domes. Like other imperial mosques, the Yeni Mosque was originally designed as a complex with additional buildings constructed to serve cultural needs of the city. One of the buildings that still survives is the Egyptian or Spice Bazaar, a popular tourist destination and the city’s second largest market behind the Grand Bazaar.

Other noteworthy Mosques

The Nuruosmaniye Mosque, situated near the Grand Bazaar and an example of Ottoman Baroque style; the Rüstem Pasha Mosque, a 16th Century structure noted for its impressive and extensive interior tile work; the Laleli Mosque, known in Turkish as the Tulip Mosque; and the Arap Mosque, a former Roman Catholic church constructed in Italian Gothic style, with little changes made following its conversion to a mosque.

Please don’t forget: For visitors to Istanbul it is important to remember that many of the city’s mosques are active religious centers, thus certain protocol must be followed when entering these buildings. Many mosques post their respective rules outside the entrance to the building. Most will require the removal of one’s shoes. Many will ask that women cover their head and that shorts and short skirts not be worn in the building. For female visitors to a mosque, it is best to carry a scarf and shawl when visiting, so one can cover the head and arms if necessary. Many mosques will allow photography, but are more restrictive with flash photography and most never allow photography during prayer.

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